Queen Elizabeth, Wilding stamps

Great Britain
'Wilding' Postage stamps issued 1952-1967 during
the reign of Queen Elizabeth II

1955 to 1960

1 August 1957 World Scout Jamboree wmk St. Edwards Crown with ER. [Nr. printed]
Designers : Mary Adshead (2½d),[137,235,000] Pat Keely (4d)[9,318,000] W.H.Brown (1s 3d)[3,820,000]


12 September 1957 46th Inter-Parliamentary Union Conference - The was an overprint on the definitive stamp already issued.[10,472,160] It is hard to see the overprint as it is in very small font in the same colour, but the words can be seen on either side of the oval frame of the portrait, with the 46th to the left of the Queen's face.


18 July 1958 Sixth British Empire and Commonwealth Games, Cardiff. Designers : Reynolds Stone (3d)[320,400,000], W.H.Brown (6d)[28,595,880] Pat Keely (1s3d)[9,970,000]


Edward Watermark - Graphite-lined issue

The increase in the mail handled by the Post Office was so great, that improved handling methods had to be developed. The most important of these was the introduction of a machine which could "face-up" the letters, and separate them into first and second class mail, in the same operation. The machine was used experimentally only in Southampton, using a method of electrical detection. For the machine to work, lines of graphite were applied beneath the gum, two lines on the 3d for first class mail.

Coil join on graphite-lined stamp.

The coils of 480 stamps were made up from the sheet printings, (12 rows of 20 stamps), being joined by the margin paper, after each 20th stamp

The next change was another alteration to the watermark from the St. Edwards Crown and cypher to the Multiple Crown watermark. The first appearance of the 3d with this watermark was in November 1958 in booklet form, and on December 9, 1958 in sheets.

   

The graphite lines were also applied to the stamps with the Multiple Crown watermark. The graphite was not totally successful, so phosphor was tried, in addition to the graphite. The existing graphite stamps were overprinted on the face with phosphorescent ink which, when exposed to ultra-violet light, releases energy in the form of visible light.These were used experimentally in Southampton from November 1959 to February 1960, when ALF the automatic letter facing machine operated with two scanners, one for graphite and one for phosphor. Not all stamps were produced with the graphite and/or phosphor lines, but which ones can be checked with the SG catalogues. For instance the 3d stamp had all of them at different times. One issue bearing two graphite lines on the back, and two side phosphor bands on the front was issued November 18, 1959.

The experiments proved that the phosphor appeared most successful, so the graphite was discontinued in favour of phosphor bands.

Cylinder block with phosphor lines

Phosphor lined stamps were issued from June 22, 1960. These phosphor issues are a study on their own, as three different types were used, emitting green, blue or violet phosphorescence. They cannot be demonstrated on an album page without the use of an ultraviolet lamp, as this is the only way to distinguish the colours accurately. However the bands can be seen on this cylinder block, as strips down the centre of the stamps, continuing on into the bottom sheet margin.


Phosphors from 1960
This is a very complex part of the Wilding story, as it was a period of expermentation giving a combination of different phosphor, and different papers. As can be seen from the following list of the issues this would be beyond the scope of this section of our website, and as as the phosphor lines do not show up very well there is no point in illustrations.

  • Green phosphor 9 values from halfpenny to 1/3d
  • Blue phosphor on cream paper 13 values from halfpenny to 1/3d
  • Blue phosphor on whiter paper 11 values from halfpenny to 1/3d
  • Violet phosphor 8mm wide 7 values from halfpenny to 1/3d
  • Violet phosphor 9mm wide 13 values from halfpenny to 1/3d
  • Blue phosphor one side band on the 3d value only
  • Violet phosphor one side band on the 3d value only
  • Violet phosphor one centre band on the 3d value only

  • 7 July 1960 Tercentenary of Establishment of the “General Letter Office”. Designers: Reynolds Stone (3d)[143,390,260] Faith Jaques (1s 3d)[6,090,840]. Wmk Multiple crowns

    19 September 1960 1st anniversary of European Postal and Telecommunications Conference (Europa) Wmk Multiple crowns
    Designers: P Rahikainen and R.Stone . 6d [16,990,320]; 1s 6d [7,682,520]


    1958-1967 Regional issues with the Wilding portrait

    In 1958 there were six 'Regions' for which the stamps were issued:-

    Guernsey, Jersey, the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

    Guernsey and Jersey are Islands in the English Channel and the Isle of Man is in the Irish Sea, some 60 miles from Liverpool.

    The issues of Regional Stamps, now known as 'Country Stamps' are quite complex and in this article I am dealing only with the Sterling values as it is those which are illustrated on the booklet.

    On the stamps for all regions the portrait was by Dorothy Wilding and the printing in photo by Harrison and Sons.

    Basic Issues

    Guernsey

    Designer:- E. A. Piprell.
    1958-67 Watermark Multiple Crowns.
    2½d, 3d, 4d.
    1968-69 No watermark, but in the same design.
    4d (pale ultramarine) 4d (olive-sepia) 4d (brt vermilion) 5d.


    Jersey

    Designers:- 2½d - E. Blampied. Others - W. Gardner.
    1958-67 Watermark Multiple Crowns.
    2½d, 3d, 4d.
    1968-69 No watermark, but in the same design.
    4d (olive-sepia) 4d (brt vermilion) 5d.
    The islands of Guernsey and Jersey both became postally independent on 1st October 1969 and issued their own stamps.


    Isle of Man


    Designer:- J. Nicholson.
    1958-68 Watermark Multiple Crowns.
    2½d, 3d, 4d.
    1968-69 No watermark, but in the same design.
    4d (blue) 4d (olive-sepia) 4d (brt vermilion) 5d.
    The Isle of Man became postally independent on 5th July 1973 so they had one issue of four decimal currency Regional Stamps in 1971 before they issued their own stamps.


    Northern Ireland


    Designers:- W. Hollywood (3d, 4d, 5d.) L. Pilton (6d, 9d.) T. Collins (1/3d, 1/6d.)
    1958-67 Watermark Multiple Crowns.
    3d, 4d, 6d, 9d, 1/3d, 1/6d.
    1968-69 No watermark.
    4d (dp brt blue) 4d (olive-sepia) 4d (brt vermilion) 5d, 1/6d.


    Scotland


    Designers:- G. Huntly (3d, 4d, 5d.) J. Fleming (6d, 9d.) A. Imrie (1/3d, 1/6d.)
    1958-67 Watermark Multiple Crowns.
    3d, 4d, 6d, 9d, 1/3d, 1/6d.
    1967-70 No watermark.
    3d, 4d (dp brt blue) 4d (olive-sepia) 4d (brt vermilion) 5d, 9d, 1/6d.


    Wales


    Designer:- R. Stone.
    1958-67 Watermark Multiple Crowns
    3d, 4d, 6d, 9d, 1/3d, 1/6d.
    1967-69 No watermark.
    3d, 4d (ultramarine) 4d (olive-sepia) 4d (brt vermilion) 5d, 1/6d.


    As can be seen from the illustrations, the designs are very distinctive and a collection of even the basic values would be very attractive. I have a soft spot for the dragons on the Welsh issues. If you feel you need more of a challenge there are the usual variations of phosphor bands, missing phosphor etc. in just the sterling issues.


    For the next page in this sequence, click on one of the titles listed below. Click on the back arrow in the top toolbar to return to the previous page.

    The first years 1952-1955
    1955-1960 definitives and commemoratives
    1961-1966 commemoratives & postage dues
    Definitive stamps inverted watermarks
    Coil stamps and leaders
    Sheet markings
    Stamps in booklets
    Overprints
    Varieties
    Return to Introduction

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